Thinking of a Career change? Take time to consider all…

career

Indeed times have changed!

When I started my career, it was very common to begin working for one company, and spend most of your career as a “loyal employee“… after all that’s what our parents and grandparents did, and as a result earned the gold watch after 30, 40 or 50 years of service! It was viewed as quite an accomplishment if you were able to stay with one company for a long period of time without being fired or laid off.

Today, people change employers numerous times over the course of their career. According to a study done by Workopolis, Generation Y (class of 2002) will have 3.9 jobs over their first 12 years on the job market. That means that they change jobs 22% more often over a 12 year period than Generation X (class of 1992).

If you are thinking about making the leap, what considerations are you thinking about? Salary increase? Looking for more of a challenge? Location? Whatever it is, making a change in your career is a HUGE decision and requires a great deal of thought.

Money tends to be a significant motivator when thinking about making a career change. But what else should you think about before considering a career change? Here are 10 items that may help you to decide if making the leap is right move for you.

  1. Wages + benefits + RRSP contribution + training allowance. All four are important and make up your total compensation package.
  2. Your cultural/personal fit with the organization and its owners/directors.
  3. How the new job fits into your short- and long-term career objectives (with regard to role, industry, developmental opportunities, etc.);
  4. The corporate brand you will be representing – can you be associated with and take pride in it?
  5. Your need for work-life balance coupled with the anticipated schedule and workload/travel requirements.
  6. The quality and type of work you will be doing.
  7. The number of people who will be reporting to you and the level of responsibility associated with the position.
  8. The importance (to you) of job security, stability, and/or the entrepreneurial nature of the work.
  9. Work location (commuting can be tiresome so factor it in there).
  10. The personality and management style of the person or people to whom you will be reporting.

Keep in mind that the only person who can decide on taking that leap is YOU! Don’t feel pressure to change careers if you truly don’t want to and are happy where you are.

Source: Canadian Lawyer Magazine 
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